Related Content: Tom Gjelten

Who are the Guantanamo Detainees?

Vault Show

Over the weekend, the United States' only prisoner of war from Afghanistan was released by the Taliban in exchange for five detaineess held at Guantanamo Bay. The release of Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl after being held captive for five years was criticized by some Congressional Republicans who argue the Obama administration negotiated with terrorists.  With the news of the prisoner swap, we look back in the Washington Week Vault to April 2011 when Tom Gjelten of NPR reported on the detainees at Guantanamo.

November 1, 2013

Weekly Show

The continuing efforts by the administration to sell the benefits of Obamacare; how the NSA collects and shares intelligence while also addressing privacy concerns and the declining public support for members of Congress and the president. Joining Gwen: Karen Tumulty, Washington Post; Tom Gjelten, NPR; Alexis Simendinger, RealClearPolitics; Doyle McManus, Los Angeles Times.

 

You Have Questions About The NSA; We Have Answers

Essential Reads

The revelations by National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden has raised many complicated issues. NPR's national security correspondent Tom Gjelten answers questions submitted by NPR listeners and readers.

April 19, 2013

Weekly Show

In a week that stunned the nation, we look at the attack on the Boston Marathon and the suspect manhunt that has consumed the city of Boston. Also, we look at the politics behind the “shameful” defeat of gun control legislation. Plus, how do leaders respond to uncertain times. Joining Gwen: Tom Gjelten, NPR; Peter Baker, New York Times; Jeff Zeleny, ABC News; Karen Tumulty, Washington Post.

June 15, 2012

Weekly Show

The Obama administration's new immigration policy that allows some undocumented immigrants to stay and get work permits. Plus, who is winning the debate on the economy: President Obama or Mitt Romney? Also, tensions between the U.S. & Russia on Syria, intelligence leaks and more. Joining Gwen: Karen Tumulty, Washington Post; Pierre Thomas, ABC News; Peter Baker, New York Times; Tom Gjelten, NPR.

 

Does Leaking Secrets Damage National Security?

Essential Reads

Last week's assignment of two federal prosecutors to investigate disclosures of national security information might have been the first shot in a new war on leaks. The director of national intelligence is expected soon to announce new measures to fight unauthorized disclosures, and some members of Congress say it could be time for new anti-leaking laws.

'Flame' Malware Designed For Spying, Not 'Cyber War'

Essential Reads

The latest entrant in the arsenal of advanced cyber packages deployed by governments or corporations for use against their adversaries is a piece of malicious software dubbed "Flame." The malware contains a wide variety of espionage tools, including a feature that activates the internal microphone in personal computers and enables the user to monitor a target's conversation.

How Things Have Changed At The CIA

Essential Reads

The CIA has faced intense criticism for reporting, incorrectly, that Saddam Hussein's Iraq had weapons of mass destruction. NPR correspondent Tom Gjelten got direct access to CIA analysts to discuss the lessons learned from Iraq, and how they're applying them to a new intelligence target: Iran.

Cybersecurity Bills Compete For Attention

On The Radar

Cybersecurity will get a lot of attention on Capitol Hill in the coming weeks, with several competing bills up for consideration. The most stringent proposal mandates minimum cybersecurity standards and requires companies to notify the government when their networks have been breached. White House counterterrorism adviser John Brennan says it is essential that the federal government take steps to better prepare the country for devastating cyber attacks.

Cybersecurity Bill: Vital Need Or Just More Rules?

On The Radar

Consider what Hurricane Katrina did to New Orleans, and you get an idea of the consequences of a cyberattack on critical U.S. infrastructure: No electricity. No water. No transportation. Terrorists or enemy adversaries with computer skills could conceivably take down a power grid, a nuclear station, a water treatment center or a chemical manufacturing plant.