Related Content: Nancy Youssef

August 8, 2014

Weekly Show

The U.S. has started military engagement in Northern Iraq, Secy. John Kerry is in Afghanistan to push for a national election resolution, and the latest public opinion polls show Americans remain frustrated with the government. Joining Gwen: Nancy Youssef, McClatchy Paper; Michael Crowley; Doyle McManus, Los Angeles Times; Amy Walter, Cook Political Report. 

 

June 13, 2014

Weekly Show

President Obama addresses the growing violence in Iraq. House Republicans regroup after the defeat of Majority Leader Eric Cantor to tea party upstart David Brat. And Defense Sec. Hagel defends the Bergdahl swap as the former Taliban captive returns to the U.S. Joining Gwen: Nancy Youssef, McClatchy; John Harwood, CNBC; Robert Costa, Washington Post; Mark Mazzetti; New York Times.

PBS NewsHour: Ousted Egyptian Leader Hosni Mubarak on Life Support

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There were conflicting reports tonight about the health of critically ill former Egyptian leader Hosni Mubarak. Gwen Ifill talks to Nancy Youssef of McClatchy Newspapers in Cairo, who says the ousted president is in a "critical state."

Muslim Brotherhood Candidate Declares Victory in Egypt

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Muslim Brotherhood candidate Mohammed Morsi claimed a narrow victory early Monday in Egypt's first free presidential election, hours after the ruling military council further expanded its control over the country by granting itself war powers, raising new questions about what authority the president would actually have.

Egyptian Court Rulings Seen as Reversal of Last Year’s ‘Revolution’

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With a pair of court rulings, forces aligned with fallen former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak succeeded Thursday in reversing many of what had been considered democratic gains that have taken place here in the 16 months since Mubarak was toppled from power. Critics denounced the developments as the equivalent of a coup.

Egypt Court's Ruling Dissolves One-Third of Parliament

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In a highly anticipated ruling that put the legitimacy of Egypt’s legislature and future constitution in question, Egypt’s Supreme Constitutional Court found that one-third of the nation’s first democratically elected parliament was elected illegally and allowed former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak’s last prime minister to run in this weekend’s presidential election.

New Question Arises over Validity of Egypt Election Even as Results are Confirmed

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The Egypt’s election commission on Monday released the final vote tallies in Egypt’s first democratic election, confirming that next month’s runoff will be between a Muslim Brotherhood-backed candidate and a top leader from the deposed regime. But even as the commission released the numbers from last week’s two-day vote, uncertainty continued to plague the election process, as it remains unclear whether one of the candidates, former Prime Minister Ahmed Shafik, will be constitutionally allowed to run.

One Thing Certain as Egyptians Vote for President: The Outcome Will be a Surprise

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In an historic first, Egyptians voted Wednesday for their next president, choosing from an array of competing candidates whose wildly divergent campaign platforms pledged everything from revolutionary, religion-based change to a return to the stability of the Hosni Mubarak-era, which came to an end with Mubarak’s ouster last year.

PBS NewsHour: Egypt's Historic Election: 'Even the Most Jaded Were Moved'

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Across Egypt, at least 50 million people were eligible to choose from a field of 13 candidates in the country's first free presidential election. Gwen Ifill and McClatchy reporter Nancy Youssef discuss what the historic election means for Egypt's future.

Shafik? Aboul Fotouh? Mosri? Who Knows? Egyptian Outcome Really is Uncertain

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Egypt has experienced many historic moments since Hosni Mubarak was toppled from the presidency 446 days ago, but Wednesday marks a true first – the first presidential election in Egypt’s history where voters don’t already know who the winner will be before they cast their ballots.