Related Content: partisanship

After Tragedy, Partisanship May Cool a Bit

Essential Reads

To the extent that Americans have diverted their attention since Friday from the horror in Connecticut toward their capital, it has been to wonder whether the school shooting would provoke the first serious gun control debate in years. But the tragedy could have an impact on another crucial legislative issue: the contest over taxes and spending.

Independents favor cooperation, are dissatisfied with political system

Essential Reads

President Obama and Mitt Romney are waging one of the most partisan campaigns in recent memory, energizing their bases with heated rhetoric and harsh tactics. But among political independents, some of the most prized voters in the electorate, speaking more softly about the other side may be a key to winning their support.

Obama Campaign This Time Around: Brutal... And Purposely So

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President Obama's reelection effort isn't the toughest, or most aggressive, in American history. It only looks and feels that way compared with the gauzy memories most have of the lilt, sunshine, and post-partisan pixie dust of 2008.

Maine Candidate: Don't Assume Party Affiliation

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Angus King is running for the Senate on a campaign pledge to tell voters how he will vote right after they elect him in November. The independent candidate, a popular former governor, is the front-runner in the open race for the seat held by retiring GOP Sen. Olympia Snowe. He is running a campaign on a platform of changing Congress and resisting partisanship, which is complicated by the fact that senators must align with a party to receive committee assignments and determine control of the chamber.

In New Gambit, Obama Asks Voters to Break Washington Stalemate

Essential Reads

The choice election that President Obama talks about is now moving, by his own rhetoric, closer to a referendum on his record in office. That’s but one unmistakable consequence of Obama’s repeated call for voters this November to “break the stalemate” in Washington by giving him another term in office. In his 54-minute speech in Cleveland, Obama once again called the election a choice. But he also said breaking the political and policy stalemate in Washington is all the election is about. Everything else, Obama said, is “just noise, just a distraction.”

Dearth of Civility in the Public Square

Gwen's Take

Flash back with me to sixth grade recess. A bit of taunting that turns into a little shoving and trash talking. Next thing you know, a circle of children are egging each other you on, chanting: “Fight! Fight! Fight!”

What choice did you have but to fight? It wasn’t a very civil thing to do, but this was elementary school.

Now, we live in a world of sixth grade taunting everywhere we look, where disagreements are settled on the playground of dueling campaign appearances and pundit-driven cable television debates.

Boehner: No Budget Brinksmanship From Me

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House Speaker John Boehner (R., Ohio) professed bafflement Thursday about the reaction to his comment Wednesday that any increase in the debt limit at the end of the year must be accompanied by spending cuts and other savings of greater value.

After Divisive Primary, Shifting to the Center

Essential Reads

Presidential nominees have several options for repositioning after ideologically charged primary campaigns: strategic silence, new proposals, a different tone on the brighter general election stage. And sometimes they can do nothing and watch their rivals do the shifting.

Obama, GOP Agree on Tax Break, Not How to Pay for It

On The Radar

President Obama and Senate Republicans found common ground Wednesday, a most unusual occurrence. They agreed that Americans deserve extensions of the temporary payroll tax holiday and of unemployment insurance into 2012. They disagreed, however, about how to offset the costs, forecasting potentially weeks of partisan shish kebab.

On the Radar: June 1, 2010

Legacy: On The Radar

Deadline for reviewing oil drilling proposal's impact may be flexible
By Juliet Eilperin, The Washington Post