Related Content: Marco Rubio

February 15, 2013

Weekly Show

We look at the President's State of the Union address and his follow-up three-city trip, the key messages in the Sen. Rubio's Republican rebuttal, and former Sen. Chuck Hagel's stalled confirmation. Joining John Dickerson of Slate Magazine: Karen Tumulty, Washington Post;Jeff Zeleny, New York Times; Todd Purdum, Vanity Fair; and Eamon Javers, CNBC.

February 1, 2013

Weekly Show

With a combination of contrasting economic data, is the US economy really on the mend? Also, does the recent bipartisan push by Congress indicate a new era for immigration reform?  Plus, Chuck Hagel’s chances of becoming the next Secretary of Defense. Joining Gwen: David Wessel, Wall Street Journal; Karen Tumulty, Washington Post, Fawn Johnson, National Journal; Doyle McManus, Los Angeles Times.

Gwen's Take | Rubio, Giffords & Hagel: The Week in Confrontation

Gwen's Take

Government can be dry. Politics can be tiring. The law, while necessary, can be tedious.

This is why high drama in Washington can be so much fun.

We saw three instances of it this week. And unlike our periodic fascination with invisible girlfriends and doping scandals, Beyonce and Volkswagen ads, these may actually matter.

The secrets of the 2012 campaign

Essential Reads

You’ve probably moved on from the 2012 presidential election. It’s clear that the Republican Party is trying to. Paul Ryan and Marco Rubio both gave high-profile speeches Tuesday in which they showed they had learned the lessons of Mitt Romney’s loss. “Both parties tend to divide Americans into ‘our voters’ and ‘their voters,’ ” said Ryan, sounding a little bit like Barack Obama circa 2008 and nothing like Mitt Romney, who was secretly recorded telling donors that 47 percent of the country wouldn’t vote for him because they considered themselves victims.

PBS NewsHour: Sen. Marco Rubio- Voters Will Choose Between Two Visions of Government, Economy

Web content

Gwen Ifill talks to Florida Sen. Marco Rubio, a rising leader of the Republican party, about his role at the convention, his belief that voters should approach this election as a choice between two different visions of government and economy, and his emphasis on encouraging legal immigration.

On and Off the Romney Bus, Tryouts for a Spot on the Ticket

Essential Reads

One of the most secretive rituals of the presidential race unfolded in plain sight over the weekend as Mitt Romney stood a few paces behind, watching and smiling, while a procession of prospective running mates delivered their best arguments against President Obama’s re-election.

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Mitt Romney speaks to reporters outside of his campaign bus (CNN)

Romney's VP Pick?

Essential Reads

CNBC's John Harwood reports on who Mitt Romney is likely to choose as his vice presidential running mate.

Setting the Record Straight on Rubio's Am Ex

Essential Reads

Even if Florida Sen. Marco Rubio isn't getting vetted by the Mitt Romney campaign (yet) as a potential running mate, he is enduring an unusual amount of grilling. On Monday, he acknowledged in an interview with Fox News (around 16:20) that it was "a mistake'' when he was a state lawmaker to use an American Express card paid for by the Republican Party of Florida to pick up thousands of dollars in personal expenses.

Marco Rubio Is This Election’s Sarah Palin

Essential Reads

Marco Rubio is this year’s Sarah Palin. As a possible vice presidential pick, he is popular with the grassroots. He is an envoy to a key part of the electorate and has crossover political appeal. He has successfully bucked his party establishment, and those who have seen him work say he’s skilled. He’s an easy and talented campaigner, and he’d wow them in Tampa the way Palin did in St. Paul, Minn.* He is also fundamentally at odds with his potential running mate’s message and criteria for his vice president.

Rubio: Arizona Immigration Law Is Not a Model for the Nation

On The Radar

Florida Sen. Marco Rubio said Thursday that he does not view Arizona’s crackdown on illegal immigration as a “model,’’ distancing himself from presumptive Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney, who has embraced the legislation. The Cuban-American senator, who spoke at the University of Phoenix/National Journal's Next America forum in Washington, is viewed as a top name on Romney’s vice presidential shortlist.
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