Related Content: Capitol Hill

March 15, 2013

Weekly Show

Republicans and Democrats unveiled their budget proposals this week, and President Obama travelled to Capitol Hill to broker a bipartisan deal. Meanwhile, Republicans met for the annual Conservative Political Action Conference where rising GOP stars rallied activists. Joining Gwen: John Dickerson, Slate and CBS News; Amy Walter, Cook Political Report; and Jeanne Cummings, Bloomberg.

From the Vault: President Obama visits Capitol Hill

Vault Show

As President Obama travels to Capitol Hill to meet with Republicans and Democrats to negotiate a budget compromise, we look in our Vault to 2009 when the president headed to the Hill only a week after his inauguration.  With the Senate and House both controlled by Democrats, the president met with Republicans to garner bipartisan support for the $787 billion economic stimulus package.  The House passed the bill without any Republican support the next day.  On our January 30, 2009 show, Alexis Simendinger and John Dickerson talked about the effort at bipartisanship.

What should the U.S. learn from Europe's woes?

Essential Reads

As President Obama and Capitol Hill lawmakers assess the need for spending cuts and tax increases against the risk of triggering a new recession, they might look across the Atlantic for insights from those who have already grappled with those budgetary questions.

Dimon's Big Day on Capitol Hill

Essential Reads

Major Garrett, National Journal White House correspondent, and CNBC's John Harwood report on the politics behind today's Senate hearing and provide a preview of questions likely to be asked of key witness Jamie Dimon.

Washington’s Year of Drama Leaves Little Done Regarding Debt

On The Radar

Reid Ribble, a Wisconsin roofing contractor-turned-Republican lawmaker, has helped change the way Washington talks about the national debt. That’s not to say he has done much about the debt itself. Nearly a year ago, Ribble and other newly elected House Republicans came to Capitol Hill on a single-minded mission to shove the federal debt to the top of the congressional agenda. They succeeded.

Congressional Committees, RIP: 1789-2011

On The Radar

Committees don’t count in the House and Senate anymore. Almost all important pieces of legislation passed by the 112th Congress emerged not from the traditional process of committee members debating and marking up bills, but from backroom negotiations among party leaders. The latest examples are the compromises on extending the payroll-tax cut and unemployment benefits hashed out among congressional leaders this week.

On the Radar: July 25, 2011

Legacy: On The Radar

February 12, 2010

Weekly Show

Gwen and the panel discuss the bipartisan thaw, the President's overtures and GOP skepticism, the focus on the new jobs bill and Iran's taunting of the West.