Related Content: Gwen Ifill

Gwen’s Take | Journalism 101: Getting It Right

Gwen's Take

It had already been a hectic, headlong week when a reporter I like, respect and admire made a big mistake. In the rush to get the news fast and first, he got it wrong.

I'm not interested in beating up on him, because it could have easily been me. We all want instant solace. When the President declared to the mourners gathered at Boston's Cathedral of The Holy Cross: "Yes, we will find you. And, yes, you will face justice." We got that. That's how the story ends, right? The bad guys get caught.

What It Takes, On Journalism and Politics

Gwen's Take

Earlier this week, I joined with many of my fellow political journalists in a collective gush of surprise and sadness at the death of writer Richard Ben Cramer.

It was sad that he died at 62; sadder yet that a man who I can scarcely envision without a big fat cigar in hand died of lung cancer.

PBS Newshour: Education Secretary Arne Duncan on Newtown, Gun Violence

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In a wide-ranging and personal interview Secretary of Education Arne Duncan talked to Gwen Ifill about growing up in Chicago, saying, "Gun violence has haunted me my entire life." In his first interview since the tragedy, he described how crimes against school children during his tenure as superintendent of the Chicago public school system shaped his own views on guns. And, while warning "it will never be the entire solution," Duncan looked at the role government can start to play in trying to solve these problems.

Chat with Gwen: December 20, 2012

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Gwen's Chat, scheduled for Thursday, December 20 at 12 p.m. E.T., has
been canceled. Tune into to watch Gwen anchor an hour-long PBS special
"After Newtown" on Friday, December 21 at 8 p.m. ET.

PBS NewsHour: Book Examines Varied 'Tapestry' of Michelle Obama's American Ancestry

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When Rachel Swarns began research on First Lady Michelle Obama's American lineage, she discovered remarkable family sagas, including the story of Mrs. Obama's white great-great-great-grandfather. Gwen Ifill talks to New York Times' Rachel Swarns about her new book on the genealogy of Michelle Obama, "American Tapestry."

Chat With Gwen: June 28, 2012

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Thursday, June 28, 2012

Thanks to everyone who participated in the Thursday, June 28th live chat with Gwen Ifill. Read the transcript below.

PBS NewsHour: The Best and Worst Places to Be a Mom

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Norway is the healthiest country in the world to be a mother, according to a new report released by the international non-profit Save the Children. The worst: West Africa's Niger. Gwen Ifill and Save the Children President Carolyn Miles discuss what countries are best and worst at creating healthy children and mothers.

PBS NewsHour: Obama's Afghanistan Address: 'This Was Not a Mission Accomplished Speech'

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In a surprise visit Tuesday to Afghanistan, President Obama addressed the nation and said he knew many Americans are tired of war, but underscored a need to "destroy al Qaeda." Gwen Ifill, RAND Corporation's Seth Jones and Brian Katulis of the Center for American Progress discuss the implications of the president's speech.

PBS NewsHour: Obama's Afghanistan Pact: What it Does, What it Doesn't Do

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President Obama made a surprise visit Tuesday to Afghanistan to mark the first anniversary of the killing of Osama bin Laden. Gwen Ifill gets an update from the AP's Patrick Quinn in Kabul plus analysis of the agreement the president signed from RAND Corporation's Seth Jones and Brian Katulis of the Center for American Progress.

PBS NewsHour: Examining the Electoral Map, President Obama's Arguments for a Second Term

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In this week's Political Checklist, Political Editor Christina Bellantoni chatted with senior correspondents Gwen Ifill and Judy Woodruff about President Obama's latest campaign video, which reminds voters he inherited a bad economy from President George W. Bush. Gwen notes that argument only works for so long, and also pointed out that the "economy" means different things to different people when it comes to their votes.