Related Content: Joan Biskupic

June 28, 2013

Weekly Show

The Supreme Court handed down decisions this week on key social issues including same sex marriage, affirmative action and voting rights. What are the legal, political and policy effects of these landmark decisions? Joining Gwen: Pete Williams, NBC News; Joan Biskupic, Reuters; Dan Balz, Washington Post; and Amy Walter, Cook Political Report. 

 

Court May Limit Use of Race in College Admission Decisions

Essential Reads

Thirty-five years after the Supreme Court set the terms for boosting college admissions of African Americans and other minorities, the court may be about to issue a ruling that could restrict universities' use of race in deciding who is awarded places.

March 1, 2013

Weekly Show

We look at why the White House and Congress could not reach a deal to avoid the sequester before the March 1 deadline.  Plus, the potential economic impact of mandatory federal spending cuts.  Also, we analyze the Supreme Court case that challenges a key part of the Voting Rights Act of 1965. Joining Gwen: Joan Biskupic, Reuters; Gloria Borger, CNN; and David Wessel, Wall Street Journal.  

 

June 29, 2012

Weekly Show

How did the Supreme Court’s decision to uphold President Obama’s health care law come together? Plus, what effect will it have on the election? And a review of other Supreme Court rulings. Also, the House voted to hold Eric Holder in contempt of congress. Joining Gwen: Pete Williams, NBC News; Joan Biskupic, Reuters; John Dickerson, Slate and CBS News; Naftali Bendavid, the Wall Street Journal.

Immigration Ruling Won't be End of the Road

Essential Reads

As the Supreme Court readies a decision on Arizona's tough immigration law, the consensus among advocates on both sides is that at least part of the measure will be upheld. If that happens, a separate pending case might block the law from taking effect.

Read More

The U.S. Supreme Court (CNN, File Photo)

From Alabama, an Epic Challenge to Voting Rights

Essential Reads

Four years ago, in this small city of gentle hills, tall oaks and nine stoplights, an invisible line was drawn a few miles north of the center of town. It stretched up beyond Highway 22 and looped west across Interstate 65, sweeping in recent housing developments, the brown-brick Concord Baptist Church and a new Wal-Mart. The narrow five-square-mile rectangle enlarged Voting District 2.

U.S. High Court Appears to Back Arizona on Immigration

Essential Reads

Conservative justices who hold a majority on the U.S. Supreme Court appeared to endorse Arizona's immigration crackdown on Wednesday, rejecting the Obama administration stance that the federal government has sole power over those who illegally enter the United States.

The Backstory: Cameras in the Supreme Court

Web content

Why aren’t video cameras allowed in Supreme Court hearings? Would they change the outcome of the case or the way the public sees the court? In the week following the oral arguments on the Affordable Care Act, Gwen got the Backstory from Pete Williams of NBC News and Joan Biskupic of Reuters.

Justice Kagan--Giving Liberals a Rhetorical Lift

On The Radar

During three days of arguments over the Obama healthcare plan, Supreme Court Justice Elena Kagan put on a display of rhetorical firepower, reinforcing predictions that the newest liberal justice is best equipped to take on the conservative, five-man majority controlling the bench.
Read More

March 30, 2012

Weekly Show

The Supreme Court heard three days of arguments on the 2010 Affordable Care Act. What were the key issues before the court? Plus, a mic catches a private comment between President Obama and Russian President Medvedev. Also, Mitt Romney’s latest endorsements and the GOP race. Joining Gwen: Joan Biskupic, Reuters; Pete Williams, NBC News; Jeff Zeleny, New York Times; Julianna Goldman, Bloomberg News