Related Content: Harry Reid

Avoiding the 'Nuclear Option' in 2005

Vault Show

May 20, 2005

December 28, 2012

Weekly Show

In our final show of 2012, we explore the year’s significant stories including President Obama’s re-election victory over Mitt Romney; Congress’ tumultuous battles with the White House; and the administration’s challenges abroad. Joining Gwen: Karen Tumulty, Washington Post; John Harwood, CNBC & New York Times; Michael Duffy, TIME Magazine; Doyle McManus, Los Angeles Times.

Romney Misleads with Israel Ad

Essential Reads

The truth sure is a slippery thing in the 2012 campaign. "It's beginning to seem as if everyone's at the prow of a Swift Boat, pants on fire and conscience on ice,'' writes a fired-up Frank Bruni of The New York Times, rightfully lambasting Senate Democratic Leader Harry Reid for calling Republican Mitt Romney a tax scofflaw without offering an iota of proof.

Romney Breaks the Stained-Glass Ceiling

Essential Reads

If Mitt Romney wins the presidential election this fall, he'll have Harry Reid partly to thank. The Republican presidential nominee and the Senate Democratic leader don't have much in common politically. But they're both members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints — that is, they're both Mormons. So whenever officials of the LDS church are asked about the once-common concern that a Mormon president might take orders from Salt Lake City, they have a ready answer: Just look at Harry Reid.

Behind the Scenes of the House Republicans' Self-Inflicted Wound

On The Radar

There was no formal cease-fire. Speaker John Boehner didn’t even call Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid to offer up his payroll-tax sword of surrender. The great Christmas conflict over tax cuts ended at the staff level. Boehner’s chief of staff, Barry Jackson, cut the deal with Reid’s chief of staff, David Krone. If the weeklong tussle over a two-month or one-year extension of payroll taxes was over principle, the principal antagonist, Boehner, in the end, had neither the will nor the stomach to directly sue for peace.

Lawmakers Reach Deal on Payroll Tax

On The Radar

The ice cracked under House Speaker John Boehner on Thursday. A deal to quiet a bruising political eruption over the payroll tax finally took shape -- after relentless criticism from within GOP ranks that House Republicans had dug themselves knee-deep in quicksand. After days of thrashing and teeth-gnashing, Republican Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell offered a way out of the mess with a statement underscoring similarities between the measures in the two chambers, rather than differences.

House GOP Strategy on Senate Payroll Package Still Evolving

On The Radar

If House Republicans have proven anything this year, it’s they are absolutely sure of what they’re against. What they have rarely been sure of, and what eludes them now, is what they are for. What also eludes them at present is a strategy to get what they want once they decide on what they want. This emerged as the key question for House Republicans as they pondered strategy on Monday.

Boehner: House Opposes Senate Payroll Tax Bill

On The Radar

The Senate’s two-month payroll tax extension is dead on arrival in the House. House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, made that perfectly clear Sunday morning as he said that Congress will have to negotiate a deal closer to the House-passed one-year extension before members leave for the holidays. “Well, it’s pretty clear that I and our members oppose the Senate bill – it’s only for two months,” Boehner said on NBC’s Meet the Press. “If you talk to employers, they talk about the uncertainty. How can you do tax policy for two months?”

Congress Reaches Deal to Avoid Government Shutdown

On The Radar

Congress has reached an agreement to fund the federal government through Sept. 30 of next year — avoiding a government shutdown at midnight Friday — and was considering a deal for a short-term extension of a payroll tax cut and unemployment benefits to American workers. While a final deal on the payroll package continued to elude negotiators on Thursday, congressional leaders struck a less partisan tone than in days before and expressed optimism that a deal could be reached.

Inside Congress’s End-of-Session Follies

On The Radar

Faced with a House Republican bill that extends the payroll-tax holiday but doesn't raise taxes on millionaires, President Obama and Senate Democrats are considering financing the extension with budget cuts. And as House Republicans attempted an end-run around the effort by Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., to stall passage of a massive, almost $1 trillion spending package, White House communications director Dan Pfeiffer called for passage of another short-term funding measure.